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Many times buyers describe what they are looking for in a home to a Realtor, but end up buying something totally different.  Why?

Sun-lit living room_Finding the perfect home means determining how to turn a house into a home that feeds your soul.

A  Realtor will ask you about what you need in a house; square footage, price , number of bedrooms, baths.  You may have more specific needs in mind, too;  a large kitchen if you entertain a lot or have a large family; a small kitchen if you are single and rarely home,  a large garage for the cars, plenty of storage for stuff, lots of natural light, or a fenced yard.  Realtors find out what you ‘need’, but often forget to find out what feeds your soul and feels like home.

To better understand how to find the right home for you in the shortest amount of time, I now take an approach similar to architects or designers.

First, we will consider your ‘developmental place history’; for instance, where you grew up, a favorite relative’s home, a summer cottage.  If the beach or mountains have been your retreat, that feeling can be mimicked by wood floors, paint, reflective surfaces or stone. Avoiding building styles that evoke unpleasant memories is equally important.  Your parents divorced while you lived in a ranch house?   Ranch homes will probably not be appealing to you.

Avoiding building styles that evoke unpleasant memories is equally important.  Your parents divorced while you lived in a ranch house?   Ranch homes will probably not be appealing to you.

Next, review your home and belongings and find at least four or five beloved objects.  They often reveal how you see you world in a way you may not have realized. For instance, my favorites include items made from wood, silver and turquoise.  These items probably subconsciously remind or reinforce me of my upbringing in New Mexico and comforting times in my grandparents antique filled home.

Finally, describe the place that makes you feel your absolute best.  If hikes in the mountains are where you are happiest, a home in the middle of a field may make you unhappy.  Likewise, a woman who moved here from the west felt claustrophobic because of all the trees.  She missed the vistas.  A move to the beach proved more suitable.

Thinking about where you feel best, also aids in understanding other people and what you might think of odd decorating.   You know, the completely camouflage bedroom, the den with 500 scale model cars, the living room with the complete set of Franklin Mint plates, the purple office….all a comfort…to someone.

Some time spent considering the emotional impact of a property, as well as the financial, maintenance and safety considerations will ensure you of making a sound decision on your new home.

 

Copyright © Mari Trosclair 2016